The Life of an Illustration

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When I do an llustration I issue the client with a high resolution JPG image and I also hand over the Photoshop file. I have a document stating my standard terms which include a statement that I retain the copyright but that the client has a licence ‘to use the image for the purpose for which it was intended’. A bit vague, but architectural illustrations do tend to be used through the life of a building project for different purposes. In truth I don’t really mind what happens to them as long as they don’t end up in a book or on a T-Shirt that’s generating income that I’m not party to. Though crediting my name to them is nice.

I pass on the PSD file so colour changes and small tweaks can be done by the client and it makes printing easier if the image ends up in a document. Changes and additions to the building designs, facades etc. can also be done by my clients more easily this way. My illustrations are tools and not sacred pieces of art. They have a life of their own once I hand them over and they become part of the process of architecture and construction. It’s interesting to see changes made on the client side, though sometimes also shocking(!).

Occasionally I find them in unexpected places. A few weeks ago a client sent through an email with a link to a website with one of my drawings in. The website was announcing an Environmental licence being granted for Pemba Logistical Base in Mozambique and had a picture of a billboard on the site reproduced here.

It looked like my illustration really did have a life of it’s own and had decided to go off on a beach holiday…

Pencil Draft, Photo Filter

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I really am going to get around to updating this site soon and I really will try to post more regularly.  Promise.

In the meantime here’s an image of what I call a ‘Pencil Draft’ for a drawing I did a while ago.  The final image is included in the SAI book that is being launched shortly (‘Drawing on Architecture’).

A Pencil Draft is my first setup for a drawing once a rough layout has been established and approved.  Usually there’s a model of some kind that it’s based on.  In this case I’d made a SketchUp contour model and mapped parts of a sketch plan (golf course) onto it.  I also established some basic stuff by creating blocks for buildings.  Once printed out I start scribbling details in pencil, deleting parts with Tipex (White Out if you’re American) and shoving down just enough info to enable me to work it up in more detail with an ink overlay.

Usually I take it off my board and scan it to send to the client but in this case I was a bit rushed and took a photo for client approval before the ink stage.

… and then a few days later I played around with the every popular ‘Blur Halo’ filter, or whatever it’s called, so beloved by Instagram users.  I was quite taken by the effect.  Even with the fold down the middle.  So I’m including it here to see what people think.

Hello World

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It’s time I had a presence on the great web.  Wordpress seems an easy way in and I’ll sort out the UK hosting and domain names properly later.  It seems a huge minefield right now so will do some more reading and research.  The next posting should see things quite differently. (Hello World seemed pretty appropriate as I struggled to get my Frankenstein Monster into life.  ‘Showing off my geek credentials, but then I found that ‘Hello World’ was the default post WordPress.com set up for every new blog; the other geeks had got there first and I wasn’t at all original)